<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jun 11, 2008 at 4:35 PM, Joe Pfeiffer &lt;<a href="mailto:joseph@pfeifferfamily.net">joseph@pfeifferfamily.net</a>&gt; wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="Ih2E3d">Kevin Dean writes:<br>
&gt;On Wed, Jun 11, 2008 at 3:33 PM, Joe Pfeiffer &lt;<a href="mailto:joseph@pfeifferfamily.net">joseph@pfeifferfamily.net</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
</div><div class="Ih2E3d">&gt;&gt; US. &nbsp;To me, it&#39;s quite obvious that a contract without a phone<br>
&gt;&gt; *should* be cheaper, but that&#39;s a long way from &quot;is&quot; (it actually<br>
&gt;&gt; worked out for the best, since I&#39;ve had a working phne all these<br>
&gt;&gt; months as a result).<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;I&#39;m an American and your statement confuses me. Why is it &quot;obvious&quot;<br>
&gt;that a contract without a phone should be cheaper? The service<br>
&gt;(cellular connectivity for voice and/or data) is the same service no<br>
&gt;matter what phone you have.<br>
<br>
</div>Because the price of the &quot;free&quot; phone is bundled into the price of the<br>
contract. &nbsp;If I don&#39;t get a phone, I shouldn&#39;t have to pay for one.<br>
<div class="Ih2E3d"><br>
&gt;In the US, the price of service contracts doesn&#39;t change. The price of<br>
&gt;PHONES does when you agree to commit to a service contract but the<br>
&gt;service contract doesn&#39;t.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;The most obvious example of this is that one can choose how much to<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;pay up front - on can choose the phone &quot;for free&quot; with one set of<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;tariffs, or pay 75 on purchase and get the same number of minutes<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;for 10 a month less (on an 18-month contract, for example). One can<br>
&gt;&gt;&gt;also get much cheaper contracts when no phone purchase is involved.<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;Not sure if you&#39;re confusing cause and effect here or if Brits just<br>
&gt;look at &quot;cellular service&quot; differently than Americans. You are<br>
&gt;implying that &quot;the contract&quot; is &quot;the monthly service of voice/data<br>
&gt;connectivity and a handset&quot;. In the US, ONLY the monthly service of<br>
&gt;voice/data connectivity is contracted. It seems to me that what you&#39;re<br>
&gt;ACTUALLY doing when you make your purchase is purchasing a phone at<br>
&gt;some price, agreeing to a service level (monthly voice/data) and then<br>
&gt;financing the cost of that device through your monthly bill. By paying<br>
&gt;the 75 up front you&#39;re simply paying for the phone and NOT paying the<br>
&gt;cost of it in installments monthly.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;But from how I see it the service that is purchased (voice/data<br>
&gt;connectivity) remains the same price.<br>
<br>
</div>Not quite -- you&#39;re also committed to pay the inflated price long<br>
enough to pay for the phone, or pay for the phone under the guise of<br>
an &quot;early termination&quot; fee.<br>
<div><div></div><div class="Wj3C7c"><br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Openmoko community mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:community@lists.openmoko.org">community@lists.openmoko.org</a><br>
<a href="http://lists.openmoko.org/mailman/listinfo/community" target="_blank">http://lists.openmoko.org/mailman/listinfo/community</a></div></div></blockquote><div><br><br>If I make an observation.. I am an American by birth but have lived all over the world.. In the middle of the Pacific, Korea, and now Europe (again).&nbsp; One of the things I have noticed is that the laws in Europe tend to protect the consumer whereas the laws in the US tend to protect big business.&nbsp; I could give many examples but I think this whole &quot;contact vs. no contract&quot; discussion is a perfect example. imho.<br>
<br>Just a personal observation... shoot me down if you like.<br></div></div><br>